The Goddess in Mono: The Dubbing of Rita Hayworth

Marguerite Chabrol

Rita Hayworth sings "The Band Played On" in The Strawberry Blonde (Warner Bros., 1941).

Dance routine of "You Excite Me."

Synchronization of Hayworth's movements with the instrumental punctuation in "Put the Blame on Mame" (Gilda). Voice of Anita Ellis.

Cut between the song and dance routine of "You Excite Me."

Before the two full versions of the song, Hayworth hums "Put the Blame on Mame" in Gilda (Columbia, 1946).

Ending of the song dubbed by Graciela Parranga in Blood and Sand (Twentieth Century-Fox, 1941).

Hayworth (dubbed by Nan Wynn) getting ready for her entrance in "The Shorty George," You Were Never Lovelier (Columbia, 1942).

"Here You Are" (dubbed by Nan Wynn) in My Gal Sal (Twentieth Century-Fox, 1942).

"Let’s Stay Young Forever" (dubbed by Anita Ellis) in Down to Earth (Columbia, 1947).

Introduction of "Zip" by Rita Hayworth before Jo Ann Greer's singing. Soundtrack of Pal Joey (Columbia, 1957). This is the version heard in the film.

Full version of "Zip" by Jo Ann Greer, including the introduction, on the same record. This version was not kept in the film.

Introduction and address to the camera in the first section of "You Excite Me," Tonight and Every Night (Columbia, 1945). Dubbing by Martha Mears.

Same movements synchronized with the accompaniment in "The Heat Is On," Miss Sadie Thompson (Beckworth/Columbia, 1953). Voice of Jo Ann Greer.

In "The Shorty George," the most percussive moments are filmed in a frontal way, otherwise the camera captures the scene from a broader angle.

Beginning of "Trinidad Lady," Affair in Trinidad (Beckworth/Columbia, 1952).

The Strawberry Blonde (Lux Radio Theatre, March 23, 1942). Listen to minute 13.

Other source : https://archive.org/details/OTRR_Lux_Radio_Theater_Singles (episode 269).

The Burns and Allen Show, "Gracie’s Dating Services," (December 29, 1942). The episode is sometimes entitled "Getting Rita a Date." Listen to minute 22.

The Burns and Allen Show, "Keeping Rita Company" (March 21, 1944). Listen to minute 4.

After her dazzling dance performance, the producers of a Broadway musical wonder if Terpsichore (Hayworth) can also sing in Down to Earth.